Zooarchaeological Remains from the Crawford Farm Site (11RI81): Nativist Faunal Exploitation and Bone Use by the Historic Sauk in Illinois

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Elaine Bluhm Herold’s 1958–1962 excavations at the Crawford Farm site (or Saukenauk) resulted in the recovery of over 20,000 faunal remains from a late 18th- to early 19th-century historic Native American village. A broad-based, nativist faunal exploitation strategy is indicated, focused on deer but including a variety of aquatic and other local faunal resources. Domesticated animal remains are minimal, consistent with nativist prohibitions regarding Euroamerican material culture and foodstuffs. Differences in deer element representation and age patterns were noted between the Crawford Farm and Rhodes deer assemblages, suggesting variations in hunting patterns. In addition, the Crawford Farm faunal assemblage contains a wide array of modified bone and shell artifacts, providing insight on the traditional range of tools, weapons, ornaments, and ritual items manufactured from these resources.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProgram and Abstracts - 60th Annual Midwest Archaeological Conference
Pages53
StatePublished - 2016

Keywords

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