You've got mail! An examination of a statewide direct-mail marketing campaign to promote deceased organ donor registrations

Brian L. Quick, Nicole R. Lavoie, Susan E. Morgan, Dave Bosch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: This study extends previous direct-mail campaigns by evaluating the effectiveness of a marketing campaign promoting organ donation message strategies from the vantage point of organ donors, organ recipients, individuals on the waiting list, or a combination of these three frames. Methods: Illinois residents were randomly assigned to one of four organ donation brochures disseminated via U.S. postal mail. Registrations occurred via the Internet and U.S. postal mail. Results: Individuals register at a greater rate following exposure to the combination framed message compared to organ donor, organ recipient, and waiting list narratives. The campaign revealed that individuals are more likely to register via U.S. postal mail than the Internet. Conclusion: Direct-mail marketing efforts were shown to be an effective approach to promote organ and tissue donation registrations. The results demonstrated a preference for the combination framed brochure. The results are discussed with an emphasis on the practical implications of utilizing direct-mail marketing efforts to promote organ donation among young adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)997-1003
Number of pages7
JournalClinical Transplantation
Volume29
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2015

Keywords

  • Campaign
  • Marketing
  • Organ donation
  • Organ donation registry
  • Transplantation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Transplantation

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