Younger and older adults' comprehension of health risk probabilities: Understanding the relationship between format and numeracy

Cara Bailey Fausset, Wendy Rogers

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The format in which a probability is presented and a person's numeracy can influence comprehension of health risk probabilities (e.g., Galesic, Gigerenzer, & Straubinger, 2009). Many people, especially older adults, have inadequate numeracy (Kutner, Greenberg, & Baer, 2005), which may interact with comprehension of different formats (e.g., frequency, percent, or words). The relationship between probability format and numeracy on comprehension of health risk probabilities was investigated via questions and delayed tests of recall for 36 younger adults' (Mage=20.0, SD=2.2, range=18-27) and 36 older adults' (Mage=71.1, SD=2.4, range=66-75). No interaction between numeracy and format was identified; higher numeracy was positively correlated with higher accuracy on comprehension questions across all formats. The results suggest that percent format best supports comprehension and recall of health risk probabilities for younger and older adults in a probability comparison task.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012
Pages120-124
Number of pages5
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2012
Externally publishedYes
EventProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012 - Boston, MA, United States
Duration: Oct 22 2012Oct 26 2012

Other

OtherProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012
CountryUnited States
CityBoston, MA
Period10/22/1210/26/12

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Younger and older adults' comprehension of health risk probabilities: Understanding the relationship between format and numeracy'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Fausset, C. B., & Rogers, W. (2012). Younger and older adults' comprehension of health risk probabilities: Understanding the relationship between format and numeracy. In Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012 (pp. 120-124) https://doi.org/10.1177/1071181312561002