Young transgender women survivors of intimate partner violence: A latent class analysis of protective processes.

Rachel C. Garthe, Marco A. Hidalgo, Jacob Goffnett, Jane Hereth, Robert Garofalo, Sari L. Reisner, Matthew J. Mimiaga, Lisa M. Kuhns

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Research is critically needed to understand protective processes that may lessen the impact of intimate partner violence (IPV) on negative outcomes for transgender individuals. The current study utilized a latent class analysis to identify combinations of protective processes (i.e., collective self-esteem and social support) in relation to internalizing mental health symptoms among young transgender women (YTW) survivors of IPV. Data from Project LifeSkills (2012−2015), a multisite trial for HIV sexual risk reduction intervention, were used for the present study. A subsample of 78 YTW (ages 16−29 years) who were IPV survivors (i.e., indicated lifetime IPV) were included in the analyses. Participants completed measures of general social support, perceived social support from their mother and friends, and collective self-esteem, as well as mental health symptoms. Three latent classes emerged: (a) YTW who perceived high levels of social support and collective self-esteem (48%), (b) YTW who perceived low levels of collective self-esteem but average to high levels of social support from mother and friends (23%), and (c) YTW who perceived low levels of collective self-esteem and low to average levels of social support from mother and friends (29%). YTW in the overall low class had significantly higher levels of depressive, anxiety, and somatization symptoms, compared to the other 2 classes. These findings highlight how low levels of social support and collective self-esteem can place YTW survivors of IPV at significant risk for experiencing negative internalizing mental health symptoms. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved) Public Significance Statement—The current study found distinct latent classes of social support and collective self-esteem that put young transgender women who had experienced intimate partner violence at risk for negative mental health symptoms. Findings inform research and practice, stressing the importance of strengthening these processes among this population. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved)

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)386-395
Number of pages10
JournalPsychology of Sexual Orientation and Gender Diversity
Volume7
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2020

Keywords

  • collective self-esteem
  • intimate partner violence
  • protective processes
  • social support
  • young transgender women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gender Studies
  • Psychology(all)

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