Writing critical race theory and method: A composite counterstory on the experiences of black teachers in New Orleans post-Katrina

Daniella Ann Cook, Adrienne D. Dixson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Using a critical race theory lens, the authors propose a way of writing race research using composite counterstories. Drawing on data from a yearlong study of school rebuilding in the time period immediately after Hurricane Katrina devastated the City of New Orleans, the authors examine the experiences of African-American educators in the school rebuilding efforts. Cook and Dixson look specifically at how composite counterstories speak back to racialized constructions of black educators that justified their post-Katrina displacement and usher in an era of school reform in which New Orleans is described as "ground zero" for the expansion of charter schools, the disempowerment of teachers' unions, and the re-organization of teacher preparation. Given the context of the research, the authors argue that researchers should consider how composite counterstories facilitate racial research and ensure the protection of research participants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1238-1258
Number of pages21
JournalInternational Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education
Volume26
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2013

Keywords

  • black educators
  • critical race theory
  • school reform

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

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