Work-school conflict and health outcomes: Beneficial resources for working college students

Young Ah Park, Justin M. Sprung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study extends prior college student employment research by examining health as an outcome variable. Using 2-wave data from a sample of 216 student workers, this study examined work-school conflict as a predictor of psychological and physical health among working college students. Additionally, 3 resource-providing variables-work-school facilitation, supervisor work-school support, and personal fulfillment at work-were tested for buffering effects in the relation between work-school conflict and health. Results demonstrated that work-school conflict was a significant predictor of psychological health but not physical health. All 3 resource-providing variables ameliorated the negative relation between work-school conflict and psychological health, whereas only personal fulfillment weakened the positive relation between work-school conflict and physical symptoms. These findings suggest the benefits of work-school facilitation, supervisor work-school support, and personal fulfillment in minimizing the detrimental effects of work-school conflict on health outcomes. Theoretical and practical implications for researchers, educational institutions, and organizations are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)384-394
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of occupational health psychology
Volume18
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2013
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • College students
  • Physical symptoms
  • Psychological health
  • Resources
  • Work-school conflict

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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