Work as a service

Daniel V. Oppenheim, Lav R Varshney, Yi Min Chee

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Improving work within and among enterprises is of pressing importance. In this chapter we take a services-oriented view of both the doing and the coordinating of work by treating work as a service. We discuss how large work engagements can be decomposed into a set of smaller interconnected service requests and conversely how they can be built up. Encapsulation of work into a service request enables its assignment to any qualified work organization. As such, the encapsulation naturally lends itself to ongoing optimization of the overall engagement. A service request contains two distinct parts: coordination information for coordinating work and payload information for doing work. Coordination information deals with business concerns such as risk, cost, schedule, and value co-creation. Contrarily, payload information defines the deliverables and provides what is needed to do the work, such as designs or use-cases. This general two-part decomposition leads to a paradigm of work as a two-way information flow between service systems, rather than as a business process to be implemented. Treating work as information flow allows us to leverage extant web services technology using mainstream service-oriented architectures (SOA). Milestone structures may be used to formalize coordination and establish measurable outcomes. Benefits from the work-as-a-service approach include agility, visibility, responsiveness, and ongoing optimization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAdvanced Web Services
PublisherSpringer New York
Pages409-430
Number of pages22
Volume9781461475354
ISBN (Electronic)9781461475354
ISBN (Print)1461475341, 9781461475347
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Encapsulation
Industry
Service oriented architecture (SOA)
Visibility
Web services
Decomposition
Costs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science(all)

Cite this

Oppenheim, D. V., Varshney, L. R., & Chee, Y. M. (2014). Work as a service. In Advanced Web Services (Vol. 9781461475354, pp. 409-430). Springer New York. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-7535-4_17

Work as a service. / Oppenheim, Daniel V.; Varshney, Lav R; Chee, Yi Min.

Advanced Web Services. Vol. 9781461475354 Springer New York, 2014. p. 409-430.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Oppenheim, DV, Varshney, LR & Chee, YM 2014, Work as a service. in Advanced Web Services. vol. 9781461475354, Springer New York, pp. 409-430. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-7535-4_17
Oppenheim DV, Varshney LR, Chee YM. Work as a service. In Advanced Web Services. Vol. 9781461475354. Springer New York. 2014. p. 409-430 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-7535-4_17
Oppenheim, Daniel V. ; Varshney, Lav R ; Chee, Yi Min. / Work as a service. Advanced Web Services. Vol. 9781461475354 Springer New York, 2014. pp. 409-430
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