Women's Predominance Incollege Enrollments: Labor Market and Gender Identity Explanations

Kevin T. Leicht, Douglas Thompkins, Tina Wildhagen, Christabel L. Rogalin, Shane D. Soboroff, Christopher P. Kelley, Charisse Long, Michael J. Lovaglia

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Beginning in 1982, the majority of college students have been women and that majority has increased since. Explanations for the predominance of women in college enrollments and completion include a variety of labor-market factors that might now advantage men less than in the past. Avariety of labor-market analyses show that, while some recent developments may have reduced incentives for men to enroll in college, labor-market explanations alone cannot account for the predominance of women in college. Some of the reduced incentives for male college enrollment point to gender identities typical of young men and women as an important explanation for the predominance of women in college. Preliminary evidence for the gender identity explanation is offered. More controlled studies capable of testing and exploring the implications of the gender identity explanation are proposed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationSocial Psychology of Gender
EditorsShelley Correll
Pages283-309
Number of pages27
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 13 2007
Externally publishedYes

Publication series

NameAdvances in Group Processes
Volume24
ISSN (Print)0882-6145

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science

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