Why the Crackling Deformations of Single Crystals, Metallic Glasses, Rock, Granular Materials, and the Earth's Crust Are So Surprisingly Similar

Karin A. Dahmen, Jonathan T. Uhl, Wendelin J. Wright

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Recent experiments show that the deformation properties of a wide range of solid materials are surprisingly similar. When slowly pushed, they deform via intermittent slips, similar to earthquakes. The statistics of these slips agree across vastly different structures and scales. A simple analytical model explains why this is the case. The model also predicts which statistical quantities are independent of the microscopic details (i.e., they are “universal”), and which ones are not. The model provides physical intuition for the deformation mechanism and new ways to organize experimental data. It also shows how to transfer results from one scale to another. The model predictions agree with experiments. The results are expected to be relevant for failure prediction, hazard prevention, and the design of next-generation materials.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number176
JournalFrontiers in Physics
Volume7
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 7 2019

Fingerprint

Metallic Glasses
Intuition
Earthquakes
Earth crust
Granular Materials
Granular materials
granular materials
Metallic glass
Single Crystal
metallic glasses
Slip
Glass
Earth (planet)
Rocks
Single crystals
rocks
single crystals
Physical Model
Earthquake
Hazard

Keywords

  • avalanches
  • critical point
  • deformation
  • mean field
  • metallic glass
  • scaling
  • shear bands
  • universality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Materials Science (miscellaneous)
  • Mathematical Physics
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

Cite this

Why the Crackling Deformations of Single Crystals, Metallic Glasses, Rock, Granular Materials, and the Earth's Crust Are So Surprisingly Similar. / Dahmen, Karin A.; Uhl, Jonathan T.; Wright, Wendelin J.

In: Frontiers in Physics, Vol. 7, 176, 07.11.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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