Why embed? Explaining the bush administration's decision to embed reporters in the 2003 invasion of Iraq

Andrew P. Cortell, Robert M. Eisinger, Scott Althaus

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article explores the sources of the Bush administration's decision to embed reporters in military units to cover real-time, frontline combat for the 2003 invasion of Iraq. In doing so, the authors have two primary goals. First, the administration's embrace of the embedded reporter program is explained by reference to events transpiring during the war in Afghanistan, the communication technologies at the disposal of the media, and the policy-making context in which the U.S. Department of Defense determined its media-management strategy. Second, the structure of the embedded reporter program is delineated, and it is shown that the administration sought to provide domestic and international media from coalition and noncoalition countries with as much frontline access as possible.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)657-677
Number of pages21
JournalAmerican Behavioral Scientist
Volume52
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009

Fingerprint

United States Department of Defense
Afghanistan
Iraq
Policy Making
reporter
invasion
Technology
coalition
communication technology
Military
event
management
Warfare

Keywords

  • Bush administration
  • Embedded reporting
  • Iraq War
  • Militaryg-media relations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Cultural Studies
  • Education
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Why embed? Explaining the bush administration's decision to embed reporters in the 2003 invasion of Iraq. / Cortell, Andrew P.; Eisinger, Robert M.; Althaus, Scott.

In: American Behavioral Scientist, Vol. 52, No. 5, 01.01.2009, p. 657-677.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{4c7a5fc7a7d64285822e3878c0a5b56f,
title = "Why embed?: Explaining the bush administration's decision to embed reporters in the 2003 invasion of Iraq",
abstract = "This article explores the sources of the Bush administration's decision to embed reporters in military units to cover real-time, frontline combat for the 2003 invasion of Iraq. In doing so, the authors have two primary goals. First, the administration's embrace of the embedded reporter program is explained by reference to events transpiring during the war in Afghanistan, the communication technologies at the disposal of the media, and the policy-making context in which the U.S. Department of Defense determined its media-management strategy. Second, the structure of the embedded reporter program is delineated, and it is shown that the administration sought to provide domestic and international media from coalition and noncoalition countries with as much frontline access as possible.",
keywords = "Bush administration, Embedded reporting, Iraq War, Militaryg-media relations",
author = "Cortell, {Andrew P.} and Eisinger, {Robert M.} and Scott Althaus",
year = "2009",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0002764208326514",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "52",
pages = "657--677",
journal = "American Behavioral Scientist",
issn = "0002-7642",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Why embed?

T2 - Explaining the bush administration's decision to embed reporters in the 2003 invasion of Iraq

AU - Cortell, Andrew P.

AU - Eisinger, Robert M.

AU - Althaus, Scott

PY - 2009/1/1

Y1 - 2009/1/1

N2 - This article explores the sources of the Bush administration's decision to embed reporters in military units to cover real-time, frontline combat for the 2003 invasion of Iraq. In doing so, the authors have two primary goals. First, the administration's embrace of the embedded reporter program is explained by reference to events transpiring during the war in Afghanistan, the communication technologies at the disposal of the media, and the policy-making context in which the U.S. Department of Defense determined its media-management strategy. Second, the structure of the embedded reporter program is delineated, and it is shown that the administration sought to provide domestic and international media from coalition and noncoalition countries with as much frontline access as possible.

AB - This article explores the sources of the Bush administration's decision to embed reporters in military units to cover real-time, frontline combat for the 2003 invasion of Iraq. In doing so, the authors have two primary goals. First, the administration's embrace of the embedded reporter program is explained by reference to events transpiring during the war in Afghanistan, the communication technologies at the disposal of the media, and the policy-making context in which the U.S. Department of Defense determined its media-management strategy. Second, the structure of the embedded reporter program is delineated, and it is shown that the administration sought to provide domestic and international media from coalition and noncoalition countries with as much frontline access as possible.

KW - Bush administration

KW - Embedded reporting

KW - Iraq War

KW - Militaryg-media relations

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=57649135001&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=57649135001&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0002764208326514

DO - 10.1177/0002764208326514

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:57649135001

VL - 52

SP - 657

EP - 677

JO - American Behavioral Scientist

JF - American Behavioral Scientist

SN - 0002-7642

IS - 5

ER -