Why does parents’ involvement in youth's learning vary across elementary, middle, and high school?

Jun Wei, Eva M. Pomerantz, Florrie Fei Yin Ng, Yanhong Yu, Mingzhu Wang, Qian Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This research examined why parents’ involvement in youth's learning varies as youth progress through school. 3074 Chinese youths (M age = 13.89 years) in elementary, middle, and high school and their parents reported on parents’ homework assistance and academic socialization. Youth and parents also reported on potential mechanisms underlying variation in these two types of involvement over the school years. Parents’ homework assistance and academic socialization were both higher in elementary than middle school in which they were higher than high school. Youth's invitations for involvement, along with parents’ involvement role beliefs, involvement self-efficacy, and perceived involvement norms contributed to the tendency for the two types of involvement to be higher in elementary than middle school. Only youth's invitations and parents’ perceived norms contributed to the tendency for the two to be higher in middle than high school.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)262-274
Number of pages13
JournalContemporary Educational Psychology
Volume56
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2019

Keywords

  • Achievement
  • Education
  • Parent involvement
  • Parent school engagement

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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