Who Participates in Which Health Promotion Programs? A Meta-Analysis of Motivations Underlying Enrollment and Retention in HIV-Prevention Interventions

Kenji Noguchi, Dolores Albarracín, Marta R. Durantini, Laura R. Glasman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This meta-analysis examines whether exposure to HIV-prevention interventions follows self-validation or risk-reduction motives. The dependent measures used in the study were enrolling in an HIV-prevention program and completing the program. Results indicated that first samples with low prior condom use were less likely to enroll than samples with high prior condom use. Second, samples with high knowledge were less likely to stay in an intervention than were those with low knowledge. Third, samples with medium levels of motivation to use condoms and condom use were more likely to complete an intervention than were those with low or high levels. Importantly, those patterns were sensitive to the interventions' inclusions of information-, motivation-, and behavioral-skills strategies. The influence of characteristics of participants, the intervention, and the recruit procedure are reported.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)955-975
Number of pages21
JournalPsychological bulletin
Volume133
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2007
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • HIV prevention
  • attitudes
  • behavioral interventions
  • recruitment
  • retention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

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