Who is changing your question on a social Q&A website?

Si Chen, Haocong Cheng, Yun Huang

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Effective moderation of online communities is an important, but challenging, topic in HCI. In this paper, we study people's co-editing behavior on one of the most popular social Q&A websites in China, called Zhihu.com. We examined question logs to understand who/when/how a question is edited differently by multiple users; we also conducted semi-structured interviews with users who edited others' questions on Zhihu to understand their motivations and their perceptions of co-editing behavior, as well as their concerns and suggestions for future website designs for moderating such behavior. Our findings reveal that although co-editing questions is perceived as a positive and effective approach for improving questions' answerability and shaping norms in the online community, effective moderation mechanisms need to be designed to improve transparency and communication about co-editing behavior and to address possible tensions as a result of co-editing wars.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationCHI EA 2020 - Extended Abstracts of the 2020 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery
ISBN (Electronic)9781450368193
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 25 2020
Event2020 ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI EA 2020 - Honolulu, United States
Duration: Apr 25 2020Apr 30 2020

Publication series

NameConference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings

Conference

Conference2020 ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI EA 2020
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityHonolulu
Period4/25/204/30/20

Keywords

  • Co-editing questions
  • Moderation
  • Online communities
  • Social Q&A

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design
  • Software

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