When runways move but people don't: The O'Hare Modernization Program and the relative immobilities of air travel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This paper draws on Urry's four interconnected senses of mobility to argue that the O'Hare Modernization Project, carefully framed as moving runways rather than expanding O'Hare International Airport, has differentially affected the mobilities of people and land uses in addition to airport boundaries and noise, and that work on aeromobilities has not sufficiently considered spaces on the ground beyond airport borders. The relative immobility of the built environment around a major piece of infrastructure such as O'Hare has significant material consequences when the airport itself becomes mobile, reminding us of the politics inherent to the production of mobility systems and cities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)528-541
Number of pages14
JournalMobilities
Volume8
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2013

Keywords

  • Aeromobility
  • Airports
  • Built Environment
  • Immobility
  • Infrastructure
  • Politics of Mobility

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Demography
  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Sociology and Political Science

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'When runways move but people don't: The O'Hare Modernization Program and the relative immobilities of air travel'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this