When is Retention in Health Promotion Interventions Intentional?

Predicting Return to Health Promotion Interventions as a Function of Busyness

Dolores Albarracín, Kristina Wilson, Marta R Durantini, William Livingood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

To test when intentional decisions enhance retention in health-promotion interventions, we analyzed the rate of return of 278 clients of HIV-prevention counseling at a state health department in Florida. Specifically, the role of intentions as a facilitator of returns was analyzed as a function of busyness (more children and work hours), while demographic and health factors that also influenced returns were controlled for. Consistent with the notion that actions depend on ability, intentions predicted the behavior of the less busy participants but failed to facilitate retention when participants were occupied with children and work. These findings suggest the efficacy of different retention strategies -one emphasizing explicit intention formation, and the other either attracting clients to counseling on the spot or using more ubiquitous technologies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1311-1321
Number of pages11
JournalActa de investigacion psicologica
Volume3
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2013

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Health Promotion
Counseling
Aptitude
Health
Demography
HIV
Technology

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When is Retention in Health Promotion Interventions Intentional? Predicting Return to Health Promotion Interventions as a Function of Busyness. / Albarracín, Dolores; Wilson, Kristina; Durantini, Marta R; Livingood, William.

In: Acta de investigacion psicologica, Vol. 3, No. 3, 12.2013, p. 1311-1321.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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