When employees behave badly: The roles of contract importance and workplace familism in predicting negative reactions to psychological contract breach

Simon Lloyd D. Restubog, Thomas J. Zagenczyk, Prashant Bordia, Robert L. Tang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In this paper, we examine the influence of contract importance, feelings of violation, and workplace familism on the relationship between psychological contract breach and organizational deviance. Results from a study of 168 supervisor-employee dyads in a pharmaceutical organization suggest that (a) feelings of violation mediated the relationship between perceived breach and supervisor-rated organizational deviance; (b) relational and transactional contract importance influenced the relationship between breach and feelings of violation such that the relationship was stronger under conditions of high relational and transactional importance; and (c) high levels of workplace familism mitigated the effects of feelings of violation on supervisor-rated organizational deviance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)673-686
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Applied Social Psychology
Volume43
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2013
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

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