What's in a score? Differences in consumers' credit knowledge using OLS and quantile regressions

Angela C. Lyons, Mitchell Rachlis, Erik Scherpf

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Credit literacy depends, in part, on understanding credit reports and scores. The U.S. Government Accountability Office conducted a study in 2004 to assess consumers' knowledge of credit reports, credit scores, and the dispute resolution process. This study uses the Government Accountability Office data and estimates a series of ordinary least squares and quantile regressions to identify specific subgroups of the population that could benefit from more targeted consumer policies and financial education. The findings from this research have important implications for consumer educators, financial professionals, and policy makers, especially with respect to national strategies designed to improve consumers' financial well-being.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)223-249
Number of pages27
JournalJournal of Consumer Affairs
Volume41
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2007

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Economics, Econometrics and Finance(all)

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