What is the role of motivation in procedural and conceptual physics learning? An examination of self-efficacy and achievement goals

Kelly Boden, Eric Kuo, Timothy J. Nokes-malach, Tanner Lebaron Wallace, Muhsin Menekse

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

Abstract

Studies of procedural and conceptual learning typically focus on the cognitive processes involved; less attention is paid to student motivation. Motivation research has established a connection to general academic achievement, but less is known about how motivation relates to different types of learning. We aim to integrate this prior work on cognition and motivation, testing how students' motivation is related to different types of learning outcomes. Specifically, we measured 6th grade science students' self-efficacy and achievement goals via self-report as well as performance on both procedural and conceptual assessment items during a force and motion unit. Results revealed students' self-efficacy was significantly related to later conceptual, but not procedural, knowledge. In addition, students' achievement goals, specifically mastery-approach goals, were positively related to their self-efficacy beliefs.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages60-63
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 3 2018
Externally publishedYes
Event2017 Physics Education Research Conference - Cincinnati, OH
Duration: Jul 26 2017Jul 27 2017

Conference

Conference2017 Physics Education Research Conference
Period7/26/177/27/17

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