What drives import refusals?

Kathy Baylis, Martens Andrea, Lia Nogueira

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) proposed to revamp its international and domestic screening system, and is the subject of a new-food safety bill. An importer first needs to submit information identifying the product, its quantity, country of origin, shipper, manufacturer, and importer to export a food product to the US. If the product is refused entry, the importer is informed, and may provide further information supporting the product's compliance or a plan to bring the product into compliance, such as relabeling. A decrease in employment by US industry is positively correlated with refusals. Although not strongly significant, a decrease in import price also leads to more refusals. Lobbying expenditure increases the number of refusals for those sectors and times where there is a high volume of imports. Decrease in employment for a particular sector is correlated with a higher number of refusals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1477-1483
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Agricultural Economics
Volume91
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2009

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compliance
imports
Compliance
Lobbying
Food Safety
United States Food and Drug Administration
Health Expenditures
food safety
Industry
foods
screening
industry
Food
Import
Importer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Economics and Econometrics

Cite this

What drives import refusals? / Baylis, Kathy; Andrea, Martens; Nogueira, Lia.

In: American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Vol. 91, No. 5, 01.12.2009, p. 1477-1483.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Baylis, Kathy ; Andrea, Martens ; Nogueira, Lia. / What drives import refusals?. In: American Journal of Agricultural Economics. 2009 ; Vol. 91, No. 5. pp. 1477-1483.
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