What do reading tutors do? A naturalistic study of more and less experienced tutors in reading

Jennifer G. Cromley, Roger Azevedo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Virtually every study of tutoring in reading has found it to be highly effective, but the reasons for its effectiveness are relatively unexplored. We built on a small body of research on the tutoring process in reading and a large body of research from other well-defined domains by collecting and analyzing verbal protocols from 3 more experienced and 3 less experienced volunteer tutors from preexisting dyads as they taught adults with decoding problems. It was found that more experienced tutors used significantly more cognitive scaffolding and significantly less motivational scaffolding than did less experienced tutors. Tutors were similar in their rates of question asking, content errors, and responses to student errors. We suggest some hypotheses for modeling in the design of a computer-based reading decoding tutor and for training human tutors who teach decoding.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)83-113
Number of pages31
JournalDiscourse Processes
Volume40
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 17 2005
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language

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