What do NLRB cases reveal about non-union employee representation groups? A typology from post-electromation cases

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Since the late 1800s, unions and employers have competed with each other to offer representation groups to employees. In general, these groups have aimed to provide a voice to workers in aspects of their employment. These groups have widely differed, however. Employers have formed some representation groups with progressive aims: to empower individuals to manage their work, to share information about improving a work process, and more broadly, to feel a sense of ownership in the fi rm. Other groups have extended compensation beyond wages by seeking employee input in designing benefi ts-for example, a pension plan in the 1920s or child care at work in the 1990s. Other employers have formed groups to mimic a union’s functions, believing that a company union is better able than an independent union to voice the interests of employees.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationVoice and Involvement at Work
Subtitle of host publicationExperience with Non-Union Representation
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages366-394
Number of pages29
ISBN (Electronic)9781136275531
ISBN (Print)9780415537216
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics, Econometrics and Finance(all)
  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)

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