Web-based nutrition education intervention improves self-efficacy and self-regulation related to increased dairy intake in college students

Kavita H. Poddar, Kathy W. Hosig, Eileen S. Anderson, Sharon M. Nickols-Richardson, Susan E. Duncan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Dairy consumption declines substantially during young adulthood. Interventions that incorporate theory-based nutrition education can provide insight into factors associated with dietary choices. The aim of this experimental study was to improve outcome expectations, self-efficacy, self-regulation, and behavior related to dairy intake in college students using social cognitive theory. Students (n=294) enrolled in a personal health class were randomized to intervention (n=148) or comparison group (n=146). The 5-week intervention (March 2006 to April 2006) was conducted using an online course system; components included e-mail messages, posted information, and behavior checklists with tailored feedback. Multivariate analysis of covariance with age and sex as covariates (P<0.05) was conducted to measure change related to dairy intake and social cognitive theory variables. Ninety-two percent of participants (n=135 intervention, n=136 control) completed the study. Dairy intake from food records did not differ between groups at baseline; baseline intake for all participants (mean±standard error) was 0.45±0.05 servings/day for low-fat dairy products and 1.44±0.06 servings/day for total dairy products. Participants in the intervention group made greater increases in use of self-regulatory strategies (P=0.038) and self-efficacy for consuming three servings/day of dairy products (P=0.049), but not in outcome expectations or consumption of dairy products. A Web-based intervention designed to change dairy intake in college students was effective in modifying some social cognitive theory constructs; strategies that positively impact outcome expectations and social support through online interventions require further development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1723-1727
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the American Dietetic Association
Volume110
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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