“We Gonna Get on the Same Page:” School Readiness Perspectives from Preschool Teachers, Kindergarten Teachers, and Low-income, African American Mothers of Preschoolers

Robin L. Jarrett, Sarai Coba-Rodriguez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Policymakers have refocused attention on the school readiness of low-income, African American children. Yet, preschools, elementary schools, and families often differ in their beliefs about salient abilities. The degree of alignment among teachers and parents influences how successfully children make the transition to kindergarten. Focusing on one inner-city neighborhood and using qualitative interviews, the authors examine preschool teachers', kindergarten teachers', and low-income African American mothers' school readiness beliefs. African American teachers from Head Start and charter and neighborhood schools emphasized academic and socio-emotional skills. Their views were consonant with mothers of preschoolers. Montessori teachers differed from mothers in their emphasis on socio-emotional skills. Teachers' beliefs were related to school type, curricula, and teacher tenure and race. Mothers' beliefs reflected racial background. These findings contribute to research on home-school collaborations and offer recommendations for promoting home-school alignments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)17-31
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Negro Education
Volume88
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Keywords

  • African American
  • Kindergarten
  • Parenting
  • Preschool
  • School readiness

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Anthropology

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