Water conservation and reuse: A case study of the energy-water nexus in Texas

Ashlynn S. Stillwell, Michael E. Webber

Research output: ResearchConference contribution

Abstract

Due to the interconnectedness of energy and water, saving water and saving energy can be synonymous. This case study estimates the potential water and energy savings in Texas from statewide implementation of water conservation and reuse practices. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first estimate of its kind for Texas. We estimate that Texas could save 908 billion L of water and 330 to 800 million kWh of electricity annually. Incorporating water reuse as 12% of total water demand, Texas could save 2,200 billion L of potable water annually. This water reuse requires an energy investment of 710 million kWh annually for additional treatment and distribution of reclaimed water, yet saves energy for potable water treatment, estimated at 800 to 1,040 million kWh annually. This energy accounting shows a net energy savings of 73 to 310 million kWh annually. Our results show that water reuse operations are best suited for municipalities currently using advanced wastewater treatment processes, thereby decreasing the energy investment needed for reclaimed water treatment.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationWorld Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2010
Subtitle of host publicationChallenges of Change - Proceedings of the World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2010
Pages4093-4108
Number of pages16
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010
Externally publishedYes
EventWorld Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2010: Challenges of Change - Providence, RI, United States
Duration: May 16 2010May 20 2010

Other

OtherWorld Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2010: Challenges of Change
CountryUnited States
CityProvidence, RI
Period5/16/105/20/10

Fingerprint

energy
water
water conservation
energy saving
water reuse
water treatment
drinking water
water saving
water demand
electricity
distribution
municipality
wastewater treatment
accounting

Keywords

  • Case studies
  • Conservation
  • Texas
  • Water reclamation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Water Science and Technology

Cite this

Stillwell, A. S., & Webber, M. E. (2010). Water conservation and reuse: A case study of the energy-water nexus in Texas. In World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2010: Challenges of Change - Proceedings of the World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2010 (pp. 4093-4108). DOI: 10.1061/41114(371)417

Water conservation and reuse : A case study of the energy-water nexus in Texas. / Stillwell, Ashlynn S.; Webber, Michael E.

World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2010: Challenges of Change - Proceedings of the World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2010. 2010. p. 4093-4108.

Research output: ResearchConference contribution

Stillwell, AS & Webber, ME 2010, Water conservation and reuse: A case study of the energy-water nexus in Texas. in World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2010: Challenges of Change - Proceedings of the World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2010. pp. 4093-4108, World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2010: Challenges of Change, Providence, RI, United States, 5/16/10. DOI: 10.1061/41114(371)417
Stillwell AS, Webber ME. Water conservation and reuse: A case study of the energy-water nexus in Texas. In World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2010: Challenges of Change - Proceedings of the World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2010. 2010. p. 4093-4108. Available from, DOI: 10.1061/41114(371)417
Stillwell, Ashlynn S. ; Webber, Michael E./ Water conservation and reuse : A case study of the energy-water nexus in Texas. World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2010: Challenges of Change - Proceedings of the World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2010. 2010. pp. 4093-4108
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