Vote and be heard: Adding back-channel signals to social mirrors

Tony Bergstrom, Karrie Karahalios

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

In face-to-face group situations, social pressure and organizational hierarchy relegate the less outspoken to silence, often resulting in fewer voices, fewer ideas, and groupthink. However, in mediated interaction like email, more people join in the discussion to offer their opinion. With this work, we aim to combine the benefits of mediated communication with the benefits and affordances of face-to-face interaction by adding a mediated back-channel. We describe Conversation Votes, a tabletop system that augments verbal conversation with a shared anonymous back-channel to highlight agreement. We then discuss a study of our design with groups engaged in repeated discussion. Our results show that anonymous visual back-channels provide a medium for the underrepresented voices of a conversation and balances interaction among all participants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationHuman-Computer Interaction - INTERACT 2009 - 12th IFIP TC 13 International Conference, Proceedings
Pages546-559
Number of pages14
EditionPART 1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009
Event12th IFIP TC 13 International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, INTERACT 2009 - Uppsala, Sweden
Duration: Aug 24 2009Aug 28 2009

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
NumberPART 1
Volume5726 LNCS
ISSN (Print)0302-9743
ISSN (Electronic)1611-3349

Other

Other12th IFIP TC 13 International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, INTERACT 2009
CountrySweden
CityUppsala
Period8/24/098/28/09

Keywords

  • Anonymous
  • Back-channel
  • Collocated
  • Debate
  • Feedback
  • Voting

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Theoretical Computer Science
  • Computer Science(all)

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