Vivacious remains: An afterword on taxidermy’s forms, fictions, facticity, and futures

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

That taxidermy, in whatever form, requires a recognizable physical trace of a once-living animal calls attention to the inescapably elegiac ground of taxidermy and its ability through such traces to point to the world outside the home, the museum, the gallery walls, and even literary taxidermic fictions. The remains function multidirectionally in time and space. They point outward to the wider world—backward in time to when and where the animal was living— and forward in time to an imagined future of new human-animal relations. Taxidermy thus offers us new possibilities of encounter, through what I term a “speculative interspecies physicality” and “translational phenomenology,” both embodied ways of imagining empathically beyond the human.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)257-266
Number of pages10
JournalConfigurations
Volume27
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2019

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animal
Museums
phenomenology
museum
ability
time
Facticity
Fiction
Afterword
Taxidermy
Animals
Human-animal Relations
Literary Fiction
Imagining
Outside World
Phenomenology
Physicality
Physical

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Philosophy
  • Literature and Literary Theory

Cite this

Vivacious remains : An afterword on taxidermy’s forms, fictions, facticity, and futures. / Desmond, Jane.

In: Configurations, Vol. 27, No. 2, 01.03.2019, p. 257-266.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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