Visual skills and cross-modal plasticity in deaf readers: Possible implications for acquiring meaning from print

Matthew W.G. Dye, Peter C. Hauser, Daphne Bavelier

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Most research on reading skill acquisition in deaf individuals has been conducted from the perspective of a hearing child learning to read. This approach may limit our understanding of how a deaf child approaches the task of learning to read and successfully acquires reading skills. An alternative approach is to consider how the cognitive skills that a deaf child brings to the reading task may influence the route by which he or she achieves reading fluency. A review of the literature on visual spatial attention suggests that deaf individuals are more distracted by visual information in the parafovea and periphery. We discuss how this may have an influence upon the perceptual processing of written text in deaf students.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationLearning, Skill Acquisition, Reading, and Dyslexia
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Inc.
Pages71-82
Number of pages12
ISBN (Print)9781573317023
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2008

Publication series

NameAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Volume1145
ISSN (Print)0077-8923
ISSN (Electronic)1749-6632

Keywords

  • Cross-modal plasticity
  • Deaf
  • Distractibility
  • Reading
  • Visual attention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • History and Philosophy of Science

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