Validation of a model of feline ureteral obstruction as a tool for teaching microsurgery to veterinary surgeons

Heidi Phillips, Gary W. Ellison, Kyle G. Mathews, Lillian R. Aronson, Chad W. Schmiedt, Gil Robello, Laura E. Selmic, Clare R. Gregory

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To assess the content and face validity of a model of an obstructed feline ureter as a tool for teaching ureteral microsurgery. Study design: Prospective, experimental study. Sample population: Seven expert and 11 novice microsurgeons. Methods: The model was created from latex rubber with an inner diameter of 0.8 mm and an outer diameter of 5 mm. The “ureter” was created with an inner compartment, a thin wall, and a soft, outer layer mimicking periureteral fat. A “ureterolith” 0.8-1.2 mm in diameter was placed inside the inner compartment by using a blunt-tipped cannula. A standardized “ureterotomy” was performed by 7 expert and 11 novice microsurgeons. Both groups completed questionnaires evaluating the content and face validity of the model using subjective measures and a 5-point Likert scale. Reliability was analysed by calculation of Cronbach's α for all questions to ensure α ≥.7. The median responses to each question were compared between groups with a nonparametric independent samples median test. P <.05 was considered significant. Results: The Cronbach's α for the experts and the novices for content validity questions was.7 and.9, respectively, and for the face validity questions it was.7 and.8, respectively. The model was rated to have excellent content validity and very good face validity. Conclusion and impact: The model elicited positive responses from expert and novice microsurgeons and can be recommended as a tool for teaching ureteral microsurgery. A model validated by face and content measures should next be scrutinized by determination of construct, concurrent, and predictive validity by using objective measures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)357-366
Number of pages10
JournalVeterinary Surgery
Volume47
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2018

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

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