Utilizing low airflow strategies, including cylinder deactivation, to improve fuel efficiency and aftertreatment thermal management

Aswin K. Ramesh, Gregory M. Shaver, Cody M. Allen, Soumya Nayyar, Dheeraj B. Gosala, Dina Caicedo Parra, Edward Koeberlein, James McCarthy, Doug Nielsen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Approximately 30% of the fuel consumed during typical heavy-duty vehicle operation occurs at elevated speeds with low-to-moderate loads below 6.5 bar brake mean effective pressure. The fuel economy and aftertreatment thermal management of the engine at these conditions can be improved using conventional means as well as cylinder deactivation and intake valve closure modulation. Airflow reductions result in higher exhaust gas temperatures, which are beneficial for aftertreatment thermal management, and reduced pumping work, which improves fuel efficiency. Airflow reductions can be achieved through a reduction of displaced cylinder volume by using cylinder deactivation and through reduction of volumetric efficiency by using intake valve closure modulation. This paper shows that, depending on load, cylinder deactivation and intake valve closure modulation can be used to reduce the fuel consumption between 5% and 25%, increase the rate of warm-up of aftertreatment, maintain higher temperatures, or achieve active diesel particulate filter regeneration without requiring dosing of the diesel oxidation catalyst.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1005-1016
Number of pages12
JournalInternational Journal of Engine Research
Volume18
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • aftertreatment thermal management
  • cylinder deactivation
  • fuel efficiency
  • Heavy-duty federal test procedure
  • variable valve actuation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Automotive Engineering
  • Aerospace Engineering
  • Ocean Engineering
  • Mechanical Engineering

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