Using the Internet to access information inflates future use of the Internet to access other information

Benjamin C. Storm, Sean M. Stone, Aaron S Benjamin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The ways in which people learn, remember, and solve problems have all been impacted by the Internet. The present research explored how people become primed to use the Internet as a form of cognitive offloading. In three experiments, we show that using the Internet to retrieve information alters a person’s propensity to use the Internet to retrieve other information. Specifically, participants who used Google to answer an initial set of difficult trivia questions were more likely to decide to use Google when answering a new set of relatively easy trivia questions than were participants who answered the initial questions from memory. These results suggest that relying on the Internet to access information makes one more likely to rely on the Internet to access other information.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)717-723
Number of pages7
JournalMemory
Volume25
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 3 2017

Keywords

  • Memory
  • cognitive offloading
  • metacognition
  • retrieval
  • technology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Psychology(all)

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