Using the emotion-in-relationships model to predict features of interpersonal influence attempts

Leanne K. Knobloch, Bethany Schmelzer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This paper considers how the Emotion-in-Relationships Model (ERM), a theory designed to predict people's experience of emotion, might explain persuasive messages. A study was conducted in which 248 individuals simulated leaving a date request voicemail message. Consistent with ERM, people's perceptions of interference from partners were positively associated with appraisals of self threat and relationship threat and negatively associated with the fluency of messages. People's perceptions of facilitation from partners were positively associated with identity management strategies, positive politeness, and the affection of messages. These results persisted after covarying relationship satisfaction. Taken together, the findings shed light on the strengths and weaknesses of ERM as a theory of interpersonal communication.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)219-247
Number of pages29
JournalCommunication Monographs
Volume75
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2008

Keywords

  • Emotion-in-relationships model
  • Facilitation
  • Interference
  • Requests

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication
  • Language and Linguistics

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