Using news abstracts to represent news agendas

Jill A. Edy, Scott L. Althaus, Patricia F. Phalen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Many scholars rely upon the Vanderbilt television News Index and Abstracts to represent the topics covered by network broadcast news. Earlier research has shown that the Abstracts do not adequetely capture the evaluative tone of news, but the degree of topical correspondence between the abstracts and the full transcripts of newscasts has never been formally tested. This paper uses content analysis of transcripts of ABC's coverage of the 1991 Gulf War and the corresponding Vanderbilt Abstracts entries to assess the relationship between the topical content of newscasts and that of their abstracts. It demonstrates that under the right conditions, the topical content of news can be effectively represented in abstracts, but emerging topics and those not dicussed by the White House are likely to be underrrepresented in abstracts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)434-446
Number of pages13
JournalJournalism and Mass Communication Quarterly
Volume82
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2005

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Television
news
newscast
gulf war
broadcast
television
content analysis
coverage

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication

Cite this

Using news abstracts to represent news agendas. / Edy, Jill A.; Althaus, Scott L.; Phalen, Patricia F.

In: Journalism and Mass Communication Quarterly, Vol. 82, No. 2, 01.01.2005, p. 434-446.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Edy, Jill A. ; Althaus, Scott L. ; Phalen, Patricia F. / Using news abstracts to represent news agendas. In: Journalism and Mass Communication Quarterly. 2005 ; Vol. 82, No. 2. pp. 434-446.
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