Using a portable spectrometer to source archaeological materials and to detect restorations in museum objects

Sarah U. Wisseman, Thomas E. Emerson, Mary R. Hynes, Randall E. Hughes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

A team of archaeologists and geologists demonstrates how a portable infrared mineral analyzer (PIMA), first used by Australian geologists for mineral exploration, can be applied to provenance and authenticity studies. PIMA spectroscopy can be used to characterize both original materials and restored sections on stone and ceramic artifacts, including coatings such as shellac. The instrument works especially well in museuns settings because it is portable and nondestructive. PIMA Spectroscopy will become increasingly useful over time as reference databases of archaeological and restoration materials are accumulated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)129-138
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of the American Institute for Conservation
Volume43
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Conservation
  • Museology

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