Use of surface analysis techniques to determine the mechanisms of metal corrosion in animal buildings

Jun Zhu, Roderick Ian Mackie, Gerald L. Riskowski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Recognizing the severity of metal corrosion problems in animal buildings has prompted an attempt to finally determine the fundamental causes of corrosion. Based on a two-year field test, this paper investigated the corrosion mechanisms of various metal products exposed in three animal buildings by analyzing the composition of corrosion products, using advanced material surface analysis techniques, including energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (xPS) analyses. Data from these analyses showed that the corrosion products were mainly iron oxides (Fe2O3, Fe3O4, and FeO) on uncoated 1010 carbon steel and zinc oxides, sulfides, and carbonates on galvanized steel and galvalume (ZnO, ZnS, Zn(CO)3, and Al2O3). Thus, it could be concluded that the fundamental mechanisms of metal corrosion in animal buildings are similar to the classic corrosion mechanisms and the high corrosion rates of metal products in animal buildings are due to the presence of high moisture levels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)243-251
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Biodeterioration and Biodegradation
Volume39
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 1997

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Biomaterials
  • Waste Management and Disposal

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