U.S. Department of Energy's regional carbon sequestration partnership initiative: Update on validation and development phases

Traci D. Rodosta, John T. Litynski, Sean I. Plasynski, Lee Spangler, Robert J. Finley, Edward Steadman, David Ball, Hill Gerald, Brian McPherson, Elizabeth Burton, Derek Vikara

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the lead federal agency for the development and deployment of carbon sequestration technologies. The Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) are the mechanism DOE utilizes to prove the technology and to develop human capital, stakeholder networks, information for regulatory policy, best practices documents and training to work toward the commercialization of carbon capture and storage (CCS). The RCSPs are tasked with determining the most suitable technologies, regulations, and infrastructure for carbon capture, transport, and storage in their respective geographic areas of responsibility. The seven partnerships include more than 400 state agencies, universities, national laboratories, private companies, and environmental organizations, spanning 43 states and four Canadian provinces. The Regional Partnerships Initiative is being implemented in three phases: Characterization, Validation, and Development. The initial Characterization Phase began in 2003 and was completed in 2005 and focused on characterization of CO 2 storage potential within each region. It was followed by the Validation Phase, which began in 2005 and is nearing completion in 2011. The focus of the Validation Phase has been on small-scale field tests throughout the seven partnerships in various formation types such as saline, oil-bearing, and coal seams. The Validation Phase has characterized suitable CO 2 storage reservoirs and identified the need for comprehensive legal and regulatory frameworks to enable commercial-scale CCS deployment. Finally, the Development Phase will consist of a series of large-scale, one-million-ton, injection tests throughout the United States and Canada. The objective of these large-scale tests is to identify the regulatory path or challenges in permitting CCS projects, to demonstrate the technology can inject CO 2 safely, and to verify its permanence in geologic formations in preparation for the commercialization of geologic sequestration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication10th International Conference on Greenhouse Gas Control Technologies
EditorsJohn Gale, Chris Hendriks, Wim Turkenberg
PublisherElsevier Ltd
Pages3457-3464
Number of pages8
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011
Event2010 International Conference on Greenhouse Gas Control Technologies - Amsterdam, Netherlands
Duration: Sep 19 2010Sep 23 2010
Conference number: 10

Publication series

NameEnergy Procedia
PublisherElsevier BV
ISSN (Print)1876-6102

Conference

Conference2010 International Conference on Greenhouse Gas Control Technologies
Country/TerritoryNetherlands
CityAmsterdam
Period9/19/109/23/10

Keywords

  • ISGS

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Energy(all)

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