Urban revival by Millennials? Intraurban net migration patterns of young adults, 1980–2010

Yongsung Lee, Bumsoo Lee, Md Tanvir Hossain Shubho

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study investigates neighborhood scale net migration of young adults in the top 20 urbanized areas (UAs) in the United States between 1980 and 2010. Both descriptive and regression analyses show that Generation Xers and Millennials were more likely to net migrate into central locations and less aversive to high density at their young ages than late boomers were in the 1980s. Consumption amenities are a critical factor that distinguishes the net migration patterns between young and old adult groups and became a more important location factor for young adults in the 2000s (late Gen Xers and older Millennials) than in the 1990s (early Gen Xers). There exists a considerable degree of heterogeneity across UAs and neighborhoods even within the same UAs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)538-566
Number of pages29
JournalJournal of Regional Science
Volume59
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2019

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young adult
migration
central location
location factors
amenity
regression
young
Group

Keywords

  • Millennial generation
  • consumption amenities
  • net migration
  • residential location choice
  • urban revival
  • urbanism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Development
  • Environmental Science (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Urban revival by Millennials? Intraurban net migration patterns of young adults, 1980–2010. / Lee, Yongsung; Lee, Bumsoo; Shubho, Md Tanvir Hossain.

In: Journal of Regional Science, Vol. 59, No. 3, 06.2019, p. 538-566.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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