Uptake of elemental or sulfate-S from fall- or spring-applied co-granulated fertilizer by corn—A stable isotope and modeling study

Fien Degryse, Rodrigo C. da Silva, Roslyn Baird, Tryston Beyrer, Fred Below, Mike J. McLaughlin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Sulfur deficiency has become more common in the last decades and the demand for S fertilizers has increased. Commercial fertilizers containing elemental S (S0 or ES) are usually in granular form, but their efficiency under field conditions has rarely been studied. A field trial with stable isotope (34S) as tracer was carried out to assess the uptake of ES and SO4-S applied as S-fortified ammonium phosphate fertilizer. The fertilizer, which contained 5% ES and 5% SO4-S, was broadcast applied in spring or in fall and the contribution of fertilizer S was assessed over two years, by analyzing the corn plants at early stage and at maturity. In the first year, near equal amounts (12–14%) of S in the plant were derived from fertilizer ES and SO4-S for the spring applied fertilizer, while more S was derived from fertilizer ES (12%) than from fertilizer SO4-S (5%) with fall-applied fertilizer. In the second year, the contribution of fertilizer S decreased and was greater for ES than for SO4-S in all cases. As demonstrated through modeling, the results could be explained based on leaching of applied SO4-S, particularly when fall-applied, cycling in organic matter, and oxidation of ES with an estimated rate of 0.005 d−1 at 20 °C. This study demonstrates the benefit of ES as a slow release S fertilizer in high-rainfall environments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)322-332
Number of pages11
JournalField Crops Research
Volume221
DOIs
StatePublished - May 15 2018

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stable isotopes
sulfates
stable isotope
fertilizer
fertilizers
sulfate
modeling
ammonium fertilizers
ammonium phosphates
phosphorus fertilizers
tracer techniques
leaching
field experimentation
sulfur
Zea mays
organic matter
ammonium
oxidation
maize
tracer

Keywords

  • Fertilizer
  • Stable isotope
  • Sulfate leaching
  • Sulfur oxidation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Soil Science

Cite this

Uptake of elemental or sulfate-S from fall- or spring-applied co-granulated fertilizer by corn—A stable isotope and modeling study. / Degryse, Fien; da Silva, Rodrigo C.; Baird, Roslyn; Beyrer, Tryston; Below, Fred; McLaughlin, Mike J.

In: Field Crops Research, Vol. 221, 15.05.2018, p. 322-332.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Degryse, Fien ; da Silva, Rodrigo C. ; Baird, Roslyn ; Beyrer, Tryston ; Below, Fred ; McLaughlin, Mike J. / Uptake of elemental or sulfate-S from fall- or spring-applied co-granulated fertilizer by corn—A stable isotope and modeling study. In: Field Crops Research. 2018 ; Vol. 221. pp. 322-332.
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