Understanding visual cues in visualizations accompanied by audio narrations

Ha Kyung Kong, Zhicheng Liu, Wenjie Zhu, Karrie Karahalios

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

It is often assumed that visual cues, which highlight specific parts of a visualization to guide the audience’s attention, facilitate visualization storytelling and presentation. This assumption has not been systematically studied. We present an in-lab experiment and a Mechanical Turk study to examine the effects of integral and separable visual cues on the recall and comprehension of visualizations that are accompanied by audio narration. Eye-tracking data in the in-lab experiment confirm that cues helped the viewers focus on relevant parts of the visualization faster. We found that in general, visual cues did not have a significant effect on learning outcomes, but for specific cue techniques (e.g. glow) or specific chart types (e.g heatmap), cues significantly improved comprehension. Based on these results, we discuss how presenters might select visual cues depending on the role of the cues and the visualization type.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationCHI 2019 - Proceedings of the 2019 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery
ISBN (Electronic)9781450359702
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2 2019
Externally publishedYes
Event2019 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2019 - Glasgow, United Kingdom
Duration: May 4 2019May 9 2019

Publication series

NameConference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings

Conference

Conference2019 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2019
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityGlasgow
Period5/4/195/9/19

Keywords

  • Learning
  • Narrative visualization
  • Visual cues

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Software
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design

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