Understanding emotional labor in relation to physical educators’ perceived organizational support, affective commitment, and job satisfaction

K. R. Andrew Richards, Nicholas Washburn, Ye Hoon Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to test a conceptual model that specified relationships among perceived organizational support (POS), emotional labor, job satisfaction, and affective commitment. Methods: The participants included 297 physical educators who completed an online survey. The data were analyzed using confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling. Results: After verifying the factor structure, the results of structural equation modeling supported the conceptual model, χ2(157) = 225.09, p < .001; χ2/df = 1.43; root mean square error of approximation = .055 (90% confidence interval [0.045, 0.064], p < .001); standardized root mean square residual = .042; nonnormed fit index = .984; comparative fit index = .987. POS related negatively to surface acting and positively to deep acting and genuine expression. Affective commitment related positively to POS, deep acting, and genuine expression, and negatively to surface acting. Job satisfaction related positively to POS and negatively to surface acting. Discussion/Conclusion: The findings are discussed within the framework of affective events theory, and recommendations are made for helping in-service and preservice physical educators to develop emotional labor strategies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)236-246
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Teaching in Physical Education
Volume39
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2020

Keywords

  • Coping strategies
  • Emotional regulation
  • Physical education
  • Social support
  • Workplace factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Education

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