Understanding cognitive engagement in online discussion: Use of a scaffolded, audio-based argumentation activity

Eunjung Oh, Hyun Song Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to explore how adult learners engage in asynchronous online discussion through the implementation of an audio-based argumentation activity. The study designed scaffolded audio-based argumentation activities to promote students' cognitive engagement. The research was conducted in an online graduate course at a liberal arts university. Primary data sources were learners' text-based discussions, audio-recorded argumentation postings, and semi-structured interviews. Findings indicate that the scaffolded, audio-based argumentation activity helped students achieve higher levels of thinking skills as well as exert greater cognitive efforts during discussions. In addition, most students expressed a positive perception of and satisfaction with their experience. Implications for practice and future research areas are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)28-48
Number of pages21
JournalInternational Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning
Volume17
Issue number5
StatePublished - 2016

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Keywords

  • Argumentation
  • Audio-based discussion
  • Online discussion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Cite this

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