Understanding and controlling plasmon-induced convection

Brian J. Roxworthy, Abdul M. Bhuiya, Surya P. Vanka, Kimani C. Toussaint

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The heat generation and fluid convection induced by plasmonic nanostructures is attractive for optofluidic applications. However, previously published theoretical studies predict only nanometre per second fluid velocities that are inadequate for microscale mass transport. Here we show both theoretically and experimentally that an array of plasmonic nanoantennas coupled to an optically absorptive indium-tin-oxide (ITO) substrate can generate >micrometre per second fluid convection. Crucially, the ITO distributes thermal energy created by the nanoantennas generating an order of magnitude increase in convection velocities compared with nanoantennas on a SiO 2 base layer. In addition, the plasmonic array alters absorption in the ITO, causing a deviation from Beer-Lambert absorption that results in an optimum ITO thickness for a given system. This work elucidates the role of convection in plasmonic optical trapping and particle assembly, and opens up new avenues for controlling fluid and mass transport on the micro- and nanoscale.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number3173
JournalNature communications
Volume5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 21 2014

Fingerprint

Convection
indium oxides
tin oxides
convection
Fluids
fluids
microbalances
Mass transfer
Hot Temperature
Optical Tweezers
Nanostructures
heat generation
Heat generation
Thermal energy
thermal energy
micrometers
Theoretical Models
assembly
trapping
deviation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Understanding and controlling plasmon-induced convection. / Roxworthy, Brian J.; Bhuiya, Abdul M.; Vanka, Surya P.; Toussaint, Kimani C.

In: Nature communications, Vol. 5, 3173, 21.01.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Roxworthy, Brian J. ; Bhuiya, Abdul M. ; Vanka, Surya P. ; Toussaint, Kimani C. / Understanding and controlling plasmon-induced convection. In: Nature communications. 2014 ; Vol. 5.
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