Ultrasonic backscatter coefficient quantitative estimates from high-concentration Chinese hamster ovary cell pellet biophantoms

Aiguo Han, Rami Abuhabsah, James P. Blue, Sandhya Sarwate, William D. O'Brien

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Previous work estimated the ultrasonic backscatter coefficient (BSC) from low-concentration (volume density <3%) Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO, 6.7-μm cell radius) cell pellets. This study extends the work to higher cell concentrations (volume densities: 9.6% to 63%). At low concentration, BSC magnitude is proportional to the cell concentration and BSC frequency dependency is independent of cell concentration. At high cell concentration, BSC magnitude is not proportional to cell concentration and BSC frequency dependency is dependent on cell concentration. This transition occurs when the volume density reaches between 10% and 30%. Under high cell concentration conditions, the BSC magnitude increases slower than proportionally with the number density at low frequencies (ka < 1), as observed by others. However, what is new is that the BSC magnitude can increase either slower or faster than proportionally with number density at high frequencies (ka > 1). The concentric sphere model least squares estimates show a decrease in estimated cell radius with number density, suggesting that the concentric spheres model is becoming less applicable as concentration increases because the estimated cell radius becomes smaller than that measured. The critical volume density, starting from when the model becomes less applicable, is estimated to be between 10% and 30% cell volume density.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4139-4147
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the Acoustical Society of America
Volume130
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2011

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

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