Transgenic rose lines harboring an antimicrobial protein gene, Ace-AMP1, demonstrate enhanced resistance to powdery mildew (Sphaerotheca pannosa)

Xiangqian Li, Ksenjia Gasic, Bruno Cammue, Willem Broekaert, Schuyler S. Korban

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

An antimicrobial protein gene, Ace-AMP1, was introduced into Rosa hybrida cv. Carefree Beauty via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. A total of 500 putative transgenic plants were obtained from 100 primary embryogenic calli co-cultivated with A. tumefaciens following selection on a regeneration medium containing 100 mg/l kanamycin. Polymerase chain reaction analysis of these putative transgenic lines, using primers for both Ace-AMP1 and neomycin phosphotransferase (npt II) genes, showed that 62% of these plants were positive for both transgenes. These lines were further confirmed for stable integration of Ace-AMP1 and npt II genes by Southern blotting. Transcription of the Ace-AMP1 transgene in various transgenic rose lines was determined using Northern blotting. Transgenic rose lines inoculated with conidial spores of Sphaerotheca pannosa (Wallr.: Fr.) Lev. var. rosae showed enhanced resistance to powdery mildew using both a detached-leaf assay and an in vivo greenhouse whole-plant assay.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)226-232
Number of pages7
JournalPlanta
Volume218
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2003

Keywords

  • Disease resistance
  • Plant defensin
  • Rosa
  • Transgene expression
  • Transgenic rose

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Plant Science

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