Transcriptional reprogramming and stimulation of leaf respiration by elevated CO2 concentration is diminished, but not eliminated, under limiting nitrogen supply

R. J.Cody Markelz, Lisa X. Lai, Lauren N. Vosseler, Andrew D.B. Leakey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Plant respiration responses to elevated CO2 concentration ([CO2]) have been studied for three decades without consensus about the mechanism of response. Positive effects of elevated [CO2] on leaf respiration have been attributed to greater substrate supply resulting from stimulated photosynthesis. Negative effects of elevated [CO2] on leaf respiration have been attributed to reduced demand for energy for protein turnover assumed to result from lower leaf N content. Arabidopsis thaliana was grown in ambient (370ppm) and elevated (750ppm) [CO2] with limiting and ample N availabilities. The stimulation of leaf dark respiration was attenuated in limiting N (+12%) compared with ample N supply (+30%). This response was associated with smaller stimulation of photosynthetic CO2 uptake, but not interactive effects of elevated CO2 and N supply on leaf protein, amino acids or specific leaf area. Elevated [CO2] also resulted in greater abundance of transcripts for many components of the respiratory pathway. A greater transcriptional response to elevated [CO2] was observed in ample N supply at midday versus midnight, consistent with reports that protein synthesis is greatest during the day. Greater foliar expression of respiratory genes under elevated [CO2] has now been observed in diverse herbaceous species, suggesting a widely conserved response.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)886-898
Number of pages13
JournalPlant, Cell and Environment
Volume37
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2014

Keywords

  • Arabidopsis
  • Climate change
  • Genomic
  • Respiratory metabolism
  • Transcriptome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Plant Science

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