Towards a U.S. national program for monitoring native bees

S. Hollis Woodard, Sarah Federman, Rosalind R. James, Bryan N. Danforth, Terry L. Griswold, David Inouye, Quinn S. McFrederick, Lora Morandin, Deborah L. Paul, Elizabeth Sellers, James P. Strange, Mace Vaughan, Neal M. Williams, Michael G. Branstetter, Casey T. Burns, James Cane, Alison B. Cariveau, Daniel P. Cariveau, Anna Childers, Christopher ChildersDiana L. Cox-Foster, Elaine C. Evans, Kelsey K. Graham, Kevin Hackett, Kimberly T. Huntzinger, Rebecca E. Irwin, Shalene Jha, Sarah Lawson, Christina Liang, Margarita M. Lopez-Uribe, Andony Melathopoulos, Heather M.C. Moylett, Clint R.V. Otto, Lauren C. Ponisio, Leif L. Richardson, Robyn Rose, Rajwinder Singh, Wayne Wehling

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

North America has more than 4000 bee species, yet we have little information on the health, distribution, and population trends of most of these species. In the United States, what information is available is distributed across multiple institutions, and efforts to track bee populations are largely uncoordinated on a national scale. An overarching framework for monitoring U.S. native bees could provide a system that is responsive to national needs, resources, and capacities. Five major action areas and priorities for structuring a coordinated effort include: (1) Defining the scope, aims, and cost of a national native bee monitoring program; (2) Improving the national capacity in bee taxonomy and systematics; (3) Gathering and cataloging data that are standardized, accessible, and sustainable; (4) Identifying survey methods and prioritizing taxa to monitor; and (5) Prioritizing geographic areas to be monitored. Here, we detail the needs, challenges, and opportunities associated with developing a multi-layered U.S. national plan for native bee monitoring.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number108821
Pages (from-to)108821
JournalBiological Conservation
Volume252
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2020

Keywords

  • INHS
  • Native bees
  • Pollinators
  • Monitoring

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Nature and Landscape Conservation

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