Toward the ethnography of argumentation: A response to Richard Andrews' 'Models of argumentation in educational discourse'

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Abstract

This paper is a response to Richard Andrews' 'Models of argumentation In educational discourse', particularly to his suggestion that argument Uudies should turn to ethnography to understand better how argumentation is taught, learned, and deployed. The response notes that Toidmin's model of argument (claim, data, warrant, etc.) and his theory of argumentation Have called for such attention since the 1950s; however, the educational re--.eption of the model (whether for instruction, assessment, or research) has 'argely ignored the sociocultural dimensions of Toidmin's work and treated 'he model as a generic heuristic. In fact, a great deal of work relevant to 7 new ethnography of argumentation has already been undertaken in a va-iety of sociocultural settings. This paper reviews examples of such studies md argues that they point to a pressing need to move beyond analysis of argumentative artifacts (whether texts, films, music, photographs, monu-nents, or whatever) to analysis of people's embodied, collaborative, and iistributed activity in complexly laminated fields of practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)129-144
Number of pages16
JournalText
Volume25
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2005

Keywords

  • Argumentation
  • Discourse analysis
  • Ethnography of communication
  • Rhetoric
  • Social practice
  • Writing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Literature and Literary Theory

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