Top-down and bottom-up mechanisms in biasing competition in the human brain

Diane M Beck, Sabine Kastner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The biased competition theory of selective attention has been an influential neural theory of attention, motivating numerous animal and human studies of visual attention and visual representation. There is now neural evidence in favor of all three of its most basic principles: that representation in the visual system is competitive; that both top-down and bottom-up biasing mechanisms influence the ongoing competition; and that competition is integrated across brain systems. We review the evidence in favor of these three principles, and in particular, findings related to six more specific neural predictions derived from these original principles.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1154-1165
Number of pages12
JournalVision Research
Volume49
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2 2009

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Brain

Keywords

  • Bias
  • Brain
  • Suppression
  • Visual attention
  • fMRI

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology
  • Sensory Systems

Cite this

Top-down and bottom-up mechanisms in biasing competition in the human brain. / Beck, Diane M; Kastner, Sabine.

In: Vision Research, Vol. 49, No. 10, 02.06.2009, p. 1154-1165.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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