To be or not to be trusted: The influence of media richness on defection and deception

Kevin W. Rockmann, Gregory B Northcraft

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

When business transactions take place between strangers, individuals rely on the cues during communication to determine whether they can trust others' intentions. How that process occurs in the context of computer-mediated, video-mediated, and face-to-face interactions is still somewhat unknown. We examine how media richness influences both affective-based and cognitive-based trust in the context of two studies with two different social dilemma scenarios. Further, we explore how these two types of trust influence not only non-cooperative behavior (defection) but also lying (deception). Results from the first study suggest cognitive-based trust mediates the relationship between media richness and defection, while results from both studies suggest that affective-based trust mediates the relationship between media richness and deception. Video-mediated communication solves some, but not all, of the problems inherent when interacting via communication technology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)106-122
Number of pages17
JournalOrganizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes
Volume107
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2008

Keywords

  • Computer-mediated communication
  • Cooperation
  • Deception
  • Media richness
  • Social dilemma
  • Trust
  • Virtual team

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'To be or not to be trusted: The influence of media richness on defection and deception'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this