Time to compile: A performance installation as human-robot interaction study examining self-evaluation and perceived control

Catie Cuan, Erin Berl, Amy Laviers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Embodied art installations embed interactive elements within theatrical contexts and allow participating audience members to experience art in an active, kinesthetic manner. These experiences can exemplify, probe, or question how humans think about objects, each other, and themselves. This paper presents work using installations to explore human perceptions of robot and human capabilities. The paper documents an installation, developed over several months and activated at distinct venues, where user studies were conducted in parallel to a robotic art installation. A set of best practices for successful collection of data over the course of these trials is developed. Results of the studies are presented, giving insight into human opinions of a variety of natural and artificial systems. In particular, after experiencing the art installation, participants were more likely to attribute action of distinct system elements to non-human entities. Post treatment survey responses revealed a direct relationship between predicted difficulty and perceived success. Qualitative responses give insight into viewers' experiences watching human performers alongside technologies. This work lays a framework for measuring human perceptions of humanoid systems - and factors that influence the perception of whether a natural or artificial agent is controlling a given movement behavior - inside robotic art installations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)267-285
Number of pages19
JournalPaladyn
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • embodied learning
  • human robot interaction
  • robot performance
  • virtual reality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Time to compile: A performance installation as human-robot interaction study examining self-evaluation and perceived control'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this