Thermo-mechanical large deformation response and constitutive modeling of viscoelastic polymers over a wide range of strain rates and temperatures

Akhtar S. Khan, Oscar Lopez-Pamies, Rehan Kazmi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

A phenomenological one-dimensional constitutive model, characterizing the complex and highly nonlinear finite thermo-mechanical behavior of viscoelastic polymers, is developed in this investigation. This simple differential form model is based on a combination of linear and nonlinear springs with dashpots, incorporating typical polymeric behavior such as shear thinning, thermal softening at higher temperatures and nonlinear dependence on deformation and loading rate. Another model, of integral form, namely the modified superposition principle (MSP), is also modified further and used to show the advantage of the newly developed model over MSP. The material parameters for both models are determined for Adiprene-L100, a polyurethane based rubber. The constants once determined are then utilized to predict the behavior under strain rate jump compression, multiple step stress relaxation loading experiment and free end torsion experiments. The new constitutive model shows very good agreement with the experimental data for Adiprene-L100 for the various finite loading paths considered here and provides a flexible framework for a three-dimensional generalization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)581-601
Number of pages21
JournalInternational journal of plasticity
Volume22
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2006
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Finite deformation
  • High strain rate
  • Modeling
  • Polymers
  • Temperature dependence
  • Viscoelasticity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Materials Science
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering

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